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Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service
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Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. 2014

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OMA Calendar of Events: 

August 

22 ESI Orientation, Curris Center Dance Lounge 5:00pm-7:00pm

23 OMA/BSC  Back II School Picnic

28 AASSEP/OMA Alumni Speaker Series, Curris Center Barkley Room 5:00pm

September

3 Hump Nite Kick-Off Event, Curris center Stables

18 Diversity Scholars Program Meeting I, Curris Center Stables

25 BSC Coronation, Curris Center Ballroom

26-28 Family Weekend (MPAC) Meeting, Marvin D. Mills Multicultural Center

October

1Hump Nite Kick-Off Event, Curris Center Stables

11 Homecoming/MSU Tent City, Stewart Stadium Field

30 ESI Mid-Semester Meeting, Curris Center Barkley Room

November

13 Diversity Scholars Meeting II, Curris Center Barkley Room

December

4 ESI End of the Semester Meeting II, Curris Center Barkley Room

12 Hitimu Celebration, Curris Center Theater

 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Murray State University is hosting the MLK Jr. Week 2014. If you are interested in participating please visit: MLK Jr. Day of Service


About Martin Luther King Jr.  

Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr. was a vital figure of the modern era. His lectures and dialogues stirred the concern and sparked the conscience of a generation. The movements and marches he led brought significant changes in the fabric of American life through his courage and selfless devotion. This devotion gave direction to thirteen years of civil rights activities. His charismatic leadership inspired men and women, young and old, in this nation and around the world. Dr. King’s concept of “somebodiness,” which symbolized the celebration of human worth and the conquest of subjugation, gave black and poor people hope and a sense of dignity. His philosophy of nonviolent direct action, and his strategies for rational and non-destructive social change, galvanized the conscience of this nation and reordered its priorities. His wisdom, his words, his actions, his commitment, and his dream for a new way of life are intertwined with the American experience.

Education:

At the age of five, Martin Luther King, Jr. began school at the Yonge Street Elementary School in Atlanta. When his age was discovered, he was not permitted to continue in school and did not resume his education until he was six. Following Yonge School, he was enrolled in David T. Howard Elementary School. He also attended the Atlanta University Laboratory School and Booker T. Washington High School. Because of his high scores on the college entrance examinations in his junior year of high school, he advanced to Morehouse College without formal graduation from Booker T. Washington. Having skipped both the ninth and twelfth grades, Dr. King entered Morehouse at the age of fifteen. In 1948, he graduated from Morehouse College with a B.A. degree in Sociology. That fall he enrolled in Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. While attending Crozer, he also studied at the University of Pennsylvania. He won the Peral Plafkner Award as the most outstanding student, and he received the J. Lewis Crozer Fellowship for graduate study at a university of his choice. He was awarded a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Crozer in 1951. In September of 1951, Martin Luther King, Jr. began doctoral studies in Systematic Theology at Boston University. He also studied at Harvard University. His dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman,” was completed in 1955, and the Ph.D. degree was awarded on June 5, 1955.

Reasons for Service:

The King Day of Service is a way to transform Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life and teachings into community service that helps solve social problems. That service may meet a tangible need, such as fixing up a school or senior center, or it may meet a need of the spirit, such as building a sense of community or mutual responsibility. On this day, Americans of every age and background celebrate Dr. King through service projects that:

  • Strengthen Communities
    Dr. King recognized the power of service to strengthen communities and achieve common goals. Through his words and example, Dr. King challenged individuals to take action and lift up their neighbors and communities through service.
        
  • Empowers Individuals
    Dr. King believed each individual possessed the power to lift himself or herself up no matter what his or her circumstances – rich or poor, black or white, man or woman. Whether teaching literacy skills, helping an older adult surf the Web, or helping an individual build the skills they need to acquire a job, acts of service can help others improve their own lives while doing so much for those who serve, as well.
        
  • Bridge Barriers
    In his fight for civil rights, Dr. King inspired Americans to think beyond themselves, look past differences, and work toward equality. Serving side by side, community service bridges barriers between people and teaches us that in the end, we are more alike than we are different.

These ideas of unity, purpose, and the great things that can happen when we work together toward a common goal – are just some of the many reasons we honor Dr. King through service on this special holiday.

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