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The University Libraries are an intellectual commons for both on and off-campus students. Each space on-campus serves as a place for growth, these include: the Harry Lee Waterfield Library, the Forrest C. Pogue Special Collections Library and University Archives, the James O. Overby Legal Resources Library, and the Wrather West Kentucky Museum.

The main branch, Waterfield Library, functions as an active study and learning space dedicated to all disciplines. Inside are both quiet and collaborative work zones complete with computer and printing services. The Racer Writing Center, the Racer Oral Communication Center, Starbooks, and Copy Express are all housed in this building.

Pogue Special Collections Library is a place to interact with unique research materials—such as the papers and works of Kentucky author Jesse Stuart and historian and biographer Forrest Pogue—and for quiet study. Inside is the Wells T. Lovett Grand Reading Room, which has been voted one of the best places to study on campus. Pogue also serves as a public research center on local history and genealogy.

The Overby Law Library is located on the lower level of Pogue. It contains a number of Federal and State legal documents including several treaties on education, taxes, occupational safety and health and federal practice.

Wrather West Kentucky Museum (Wrather Hall) is the first permanent building constructed on campus. It has been a museum since 1982, but still serves as a lecture hall for classes. There are a number of great exhibits in Wrather, including: the Hal Riddle Hollywood Memorabilia room, the Golden Record room, and a room dedicated to the history of the University.  Students may access the museum at no cost.

University Libraries gives students access to a number of electronic resources. Databases covering a wide variety of disciplines are made available both on and off-campus. Access Services provides students with the ability to get resources that University Libraries may not subscribe to, or hold in their collections, in a timely manner.

In addition to research resources, a minor in Information Studies (INF) is offered. Students learn about the role of information in modern society and become “power searchers” because they understand how different search technologies work. They also learn about issues relating to information, such as privacy and copyright. This minor complements any major program at Murray State.

Visit the  University Libraries' website to learn more.